Snarky Meeting Notes

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 
I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 
And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 
Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 
This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 
And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?
Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.
If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.
And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.
And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.
 

Writers write the stuff they write. Buy it or don’t. We’re not your bitches.
Oh, and “why should I read a writer I don’t like because they have POC/LBGT characters?” Why should a writer shoehorn these characters for no better reason than because you want them?

hollyblack:

ivegotthekittens:

malindalo:

From today on Twitter: I often see “I wish [bestselling writer] would include POC/LGBT characters!” But There are other writers who do this. Support them.

So, you’re suggesting I read books by authors I do not like, and/or that deals with subjects I am not interested in, simply because it has a PoC/LGBT character? 

I wish certain authors would have diverse characters because these are the ones writing books I’m actually going to read. 

And I wish bestselling artists would because no matter what their next book going to be about, it would get many readers and a lot of publicity. 

Can you imagine what it would have been like for PoC and LGBT to have their group represented as one of the trio in Harry Potter? Or even just make Dumbledore openly and obviously gay? 

This is what we need. It’s not that the public isn’t aware such people exists, but they are never in the mainstream media. Correct me if I’m wrong, but seems to me this is what all those PoC justice posts are preaching. 

And best selling authors are the main streams of books, so we want them to include these characters. 

Seriously? Do you honestly believe that bestselling books are anointed and raised up by some divine hand? Like THE CLAW HAS CHOSEN? And for some reason the claw keeps choosing straight white cisgendered protagonists written by straight white cisgendered authors? REALLY?

Best selling authors don’t just HAPPEN to be in the mainstream media. Selling a lot of books MAKES someone a bestselling author and GETS mainstream media attention. But books are sold one at a time to readers who make choices about which books they want to support.

If you want more diversity, you have to buy more diversely.

And, look, I love me and I want everyone to read all my books all the time, but reading a book with a diverse cast written by JK Rowling or myself or any other white straight cisgendered writer isn’t the same as reading a book written by a person of color or a LGBTQ+ writer. It’s the difference between a secondary source and a primary source. But if you feel that FOR SOME REASON you can be absolutely sure that you’re not going to like a book you haven’t read because it isn’t already a bestseller, then I guess that’s you, but please, please, please don’t act like it’s some kind of positive political act.

And don’t you dare talk that way to Malinda.

 

Writers write the stuff they write. Buy it or don’t. We’re not your bitches.

Oh, and “why should I read a writer I don’t like because they have POC/LBGT characters?” Why should a writer shoehorn these characters for no better reason than because you want them?

Dead Poets Society (1989)

What better way to say it? RIP Robin Williams :’(

(Source: somnulentia, via daftwithoneshoe)

maxkirin:

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing, a remake of this post. Source.

Want more writerly content? Make sure to follow maxkirin.tumblr.com for your daily dose of writer positivity, advice, and prompts!

#7 is my favorite and probably the one I follow most consistently.

(via neil-gaiman)

lionheart191 said: How do you get over being over-critical of your own writing? I try, but sometimes I can't even put out a paragraph it's so bad.

neil-gaiman:

joehillsthrills:

I remind myself that no one day of writing matters all that much. A story is built somewhat like a stalactite - one little drip of mud and grit at a time.

I  remind myself that the first few drafts are just for me. That gives me permission to let it be an ungodly mess, full of shit sentences and crap ideas, whipped into a creamy froth with the occasional bits that do work. Later I’ll winnow out the stuff that was no good. What remains will be (I hope) fun, economical, and lively.

It helps (me) to write longhand. I know no one is ever going to see my longhand draft but me. That’s a free pass to suck.

Also, though, I try and work small. If I think a scene blows dead rats, I’ll stop thinking about the big picture, and just think about the next sentence. If I can get down one sentence that really excites me, sometimes it will throw a spark powerful enough to bring a dying moment back to life.

WHAT HE SAID.

I think that may need more emphasis. 

Ahem.

WHAT HE FUCKING SAID.

There.

dasboo:

Hope this helps!

dasboo:

Hope this helps!

Anonymous said: Don't you think that having two teenagers kiss in a place as sacred as the Ann Frank house more than just a little bit offensive?

fishingboatproceeds:

I’ve been getting this question a lot. I can’t speak for the movie, obviously, as I didn’t make it, but as for the book:

The Fault in Our Stars was the first non-documentary feature film to be granted access to the Anne Frank House precisely because the House’s board of directors and curators liked that scene in the novel a great deal. (A spokesperson recently said, “In the book it is a moving and sensitively handled scene.”)

Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League and a Holocaust survivor, had this to say: ”The kissing scene in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ in the annex of the Anne Frank House is not offensive or against who Anne Frank was. What Anne communicated in her diary was hope. She celebrated life and she celebrated hope.”

Obviously, the Anne Frank House and the ADL do not have a monopoly on Anne’s life or her legacy, but their opinions are important to me.

Only if you think kissing is somehow shameful and unnatural, in which case you’re a huge fucking prude stfu.